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ENGL 1302 Taggett: Quick Analysis Papers

This guide has resources and tips to help you with assignments in Prof. Taggett's ENGL 1302 course.

 

You are required to complete ten (10) Quick Analysis Papers throughout the semester. 

Assignment directions are on the left side of this page. The right side has information about how to cite your Quick Analysis Paper readings in MLA or APA format. 

QAP Assignment Directions

Quick Analysis Papers (QAPs): Quick Analysis Papers: This assignment asks you to complete ten (10) one to two-page typed mini-rhetorical analyses. These are focused on our assigned readings and designed to help enhance your critical reading and thinking skills. 

 

  1. You will be expected to read the assigned reading (looking at the class schedule)
  2. You will be expected to analyze the reading based on the course concepts of purpose or audience.  
  3. You are expected to include a works cited (MLA) entry or reference list (APA) entry for the essay you are responding to (including, or course, intext citations in whatever format you are using).

 

These are due before class on the day that the reading will be discussed. (For example, if you are in the 9:10 class, your submission needs to be timestamped prior to that class day or time). Submit your first quick analysis paper to Quick Analysis Paper 1 and so on from there, until you complete ten.

Note: The dropbox closing dates are set to the last day of assigned readings. That does not mean that all of the QAPs can be turned in at the end of the semester. They are set that way to allow you the freedom to complete the QAPs you choose to complete. But they are due before the reading is discussed in class.

 

Go into some depth; don't just skim the surface. Late papers will not receive any credit.  

 

Sample: 

 

Eveleth, Rose. “Saving Languages Through Korean Soap Operas.” Everything’s An Argument, 7th, ed., edited by Andrea Lunsford, et al, Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2016, pp. 596-98.

In her essay, “Saving Languages Through Korean Soap Operas,” published the Atlantic, is attempting to inform her audience about the value of translating TV shows into various languages through crowd-sourcing.

While it could be argued her last line is persuasive, “[o]r [languages on the brink of extinction] could be saved – by Korean soap operas and Mel Gibson movies” (Eveleth 598), that is the only statement she makes that can be considered persuasive. Instead, she focuses on giving her audience facts, like how many languages are at risk and about a crowd-source translation website, Viki (Eveleth 596-7). She also gives specific examples of what shows are translated into what languages, indicating a global interest in all sorts of shows.

Eveleth does quote linguist David Harrison and Viki CEO Razmig Hovaghimian (597) who state that they believe that the work of translating shows into other, especially more “endangered” languages is important and beneficial, she does not, herself, take a position. Her pathos appeals consist of specific examples of “dying” languages like Udmurt (Eveleth 596) and Cherokee (598), but again, they are not included as evidence that these languages should be saved. Only that they are at risk.

Overall, this shows that Eveleth is working to inform us of the languages that are at risk and one approach to addressing an “extinction event in terms of languages” (Harrison, qtd. in Eveleth 598), rather than persuading her audience to take action.

Research and Citation Help with Quick Analysis Papers

You won't have to do any additional research for Quick Analysis Papers, but you will need to cite the reading you analyzed in MLA or APA format. 

 

MLA 

Follow the MLA format for "A Work in an Anthology, Reference, or Collection."

You will need the author of the assigned reading, the title of the assigned reading, and the page numbers of the assigned reading.

Plug those in to the highlighted parts of the example citation below. Leave the rest of the citation information about your textbook exactly the same. Use the same punctuation, italics, and capitalization you see here: 

Eveleth, Rose. “Saving Languages Through Korean Soap Operas.” Everything’s An Argument, 7th

ed., edited by Andrea Lunsford, et al, Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2016, pp. 596-98.

 

You can also take a look at the video below for a step-by-step guide to citing something from an anthology textbook:

 

APA

Follow the APA format for an "Article or Chapter in an Edited Book." 

You will need the author of the assigned reading, the title of the assigned reading, and the page numbers of the assigned reading.

Plug those in to the highlighted parts of the example citation below. Leave the rest of the citation information about your textbook exactly the same. Use the same punctuation, italics, and capitalization you see here: 

Eveleth, R. (2016). Saving languages through Korean soap operas. In A.A. Lunsford, J.J.

Ruszkiewicz, & K. Walters (Eds.), Everything’s an argument (7th ed., pp. 596-98). Boston,

MA: Bedford/St. Martin’s.

 

You can also take a look at the video below for a step-by-step guide to citing something from an anthology textbook:

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